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“Change is vital, improvement the logical form of change.” J C Penney

Duncan Corbett presenting Scientia's Cloud visionA few weeks ago – hot on the heels of a ‘big birthday’ – Duncan Corbett, Project Manager for Enterprise Foundation, celebrated his 17th year at Scientia.  The occasion was also marked by an exciting new chapter beginning in the history of the Company.  He explains all in this guest blog:


When I arrived here in 1999 to help train users of our software, Scientia essentially had two products: Syllabus Plus Course Planner and Syllabus Plus Exam Scheduler.  Some of you reading this may have already been users of those products as far back as the early 90s.  I think it’s those long-term users who coined the term “Classic” to refer to those original products in much the same way as people use the term to refer to a much loved older model of car.  Much has changed in those 17 years.

Snake game on a Nokia phoneIn 1999 the internet was only 10 years old.  If you were lucky you had an Intel Pentium II processor with a speed measured in MHz.  It was probably running Windows 3.1, NT or – at a push – 95.  Windows 98 was still seen as uncharted waters for most.  Your mobile phone, if you had one, had a small screen, buttons with numbers on and you used it to make phone calls or to play “Snake”.

Shortly before I joined, Syllabus had moved to a tab-based interface, with logical groupings of properties being displayed on separate tabs.  Prior to that the controls for every property of an object had been crammed onto a single page.  In spite of the fact that this meant you needed 20/20 vision and rock-steady mouse control to do anything, some users were uncomfortable with the move to tabs because it required more mouse clicks to get to the information they wanted.

In 2004 we released our Web Room Booking solution, enabling students and staff to make ad-hoc room and resource bookings themselves through a web browser, reducing the burden on admin staff and giving greater transparency to the process.  We also introduced browser-based data collection tools to gather the timetable requirements of stakeholders; previously most customers were using paper forms that required manual data entry with the associated risks of misunderstanding and error.  Similarly, in Student Allocator we delivered a browser-based solution that enables students to choose modules and activities, broadening participation further whilst reducing cost, time and duplication of effort.

Possibly our biggest leap until now in the development of our timetabling solution came in 2007 with the release of Syllabus Plus Enterprise – or Enterprise Foundation, as the core suite of software scheduling tools is now known.  This is essentially a re-working of the user interface elements of Syllabus Plus.  It provides a more modern look and feel, a more task-centric, rather than data-centric interface, and a more granular set of permissions.  This meant that Enterprise Timetabler, for example, might be given to users that would not have been trusted with Syllabus Plus Classic for fear of the damage they might do to the data.

Cloud computing iconMeanwhile, back in the world of technology, the big shift in computing has been the trend towards Cloud-based solutions and the supply of software as a service.  Before the advent of Cloud computing you would need to source and maintain sufficiently powerful hardware to cope with your maximum demand for computing power; implying a level of built-in redundancy.  A Cloud-based solution means that the software provider supplies and maintains the computing power and the supply can flex to meet your requirements.  Enterprise Activity Adjuster (EAA)was our first toe in the water with respect to this new technology.  I can remember vividly standing in a lecture theatre in Auckland, New Zealand, using a prototype of EAA to make a change to an activity in a Scientia Database hosted in the cloud; the server was actually in Dublin, Ireland.  It struck me at the time that, without leaving earth it would be difficult to pick two places further from each other; a powerful demonstration of the potential of the Cloud.

Scientia Publish on a mobile phone
Our Publish product gives students personalised timetables on any connected device

Since then we have made further forays into the world of Cloud-based solutions: Resource Booker is slowly gaining market share from our highly-successful Web Room Booking solution, empowering students and staff to manage their own room and equipment bookings.  Publish enables staff and students to receive personalised timetables directly to smartphones, tablets and laptops, letting them view their timetable in the browser or calendar apps of their choice.

And that brings us back to the new chapter in Scientia’s history that’s about to begin.  In March this year, at our annual EMEAA User Conference, we announced the development of an entirely new, Cloud-based scheduling solution.  That’s exciting: despite the fast-paced nature of the technology industries, it’s not every day that you are afforded the opportunity of spear-heading a completely fresh start on a company’s core product.  A store of enhancements that I’ve been building over the course of years, all of which would be too disruptive to introduce to the current solution, are now back on the table.

No doubt there will be challenges.  Customers will naturally have questions about data security and privacy.  This will, of course, be a vital component of whatever the new solution looks like, but holding large datasets securely in the Cloud is not an issue that Scientia uniquely has to address.  It’s an issue that is common to all Cloud-based solutions, some of which are dealing with data that’s much more sensitive than the timetable information we are managing.

It’s natural that we approach change with caution.  I can remember talking to users in my early days who were uncertain how they’d manage with the move to “this new-fangled tabbed user interface”, but I don’t think that any of us would now vote to move back to the cluttered single window approach.  We recognise that the change has brought improvement.  Similarly, reimagining our scheduling solution for the Cloud is not just exciting for me – it will also bring benefits to our customers: the 400+ tertiary education institutions worldwide which rely on Scientia’s products to maximise the use of their resources while providing students with an excellent education.  A timetabling solution based in the Cloud will bring a lower total cost of ownership, and improved scalability.  Free from the constraints imposed by legacy software, we can design for easier integration with other software, easier localisation and improved performance.  What’s not to like?

Our developers are currently busy planning the development project and thinking about the first prototype application that we’ll use to test our new Cloud-based scheduling engine.  I’ve already had the opportunity to share my aspirations with them so that we ensure that those goals are not excluded by anything we do in the early stages of development.  We have promised our customers a detailed development plan in July so look out for an update from me then.

Duncan Corbett is Product Manager for Syllabus Plus Enterprise.

Seeing Double: How Resource Booker Reduces Duplication

In the age of austerity, there is a greater need for universities and other academic institutions to effectively share resources and avoid buying multiple versions of the same equipment.

For example, chemistry and physics departments will often buy the same costly laboratory equipment despite the fact they are not using it at the same time. A more effective solution would be to allocate specialist instruments across both schools, therefore saving money and resource.

How can Resource Booker help?

Resource Booker is a cloud-based application that enables staff and students to book the most appropriate room, for the right number of people at the right time.

Among its many applications, the software provides institutions with the ability to share assets across multiple departments through an intuitive user interface, which contains up to the minute information on scheduling and availability. It enables students to identify free time to book equipment, while administrators have complete visibility so they know where the equipment is at all times.

In this video, Eugene Concannon, explains how sharing assets is a cost-saving exercise that could benefit any institution.

Enhancing Institutional Services to Improve Student Experience

Institutions are under growing pressure to deliver an interactive and engaging university experience. In today’s challenging academic climate, it’s important for students to have an increasing amount of choice that allows them to select modules and activities according to individual preferences, ultimately resulting in greater student retention and academic success.

How can institutions implement change without impacting on overheads and resource?

Student Allocator is an online web portal that improves institutional services and increases satisfaction with a self-service approach to administration. The software allows students to make suitable choices according to their schedule, with the option to select modules, tutorials and other activities based around their other commitments such as part-time work or childcare.

Academic and administrative staff can also benefit from the flexibility of Student Allocator by creating and reviewing programme structures and restrictions. It allows them to manage aspects such as class size or conflicting student demands in a controlled way.

When linked to Syllabus Plus Enterprise Foundation, Student Allocator can also maintain a clash-free timetable and facilitate improved attendance monitoring and retention rates; tracking student swaps between tutorial and seminar groups and the accuracy of class lists. By identifying issues early on, staff can intervene and prevent drop outs.

In this video, David Duffett explains how Student Allocator improves institutional services and satisfaction for both staff and students.

Student Satisfaction Guaranteed with Resource Booker

Student satisfaction is a key driver for institutions to keep existing students on courses and prevent drop outs; it is also important for attracting prospective students to the university.

There are a number of variables that can affect satisfaction; available facilities, cleanliness and quality of teaching. As part of the academic experience, students expect contact time with professors outside of designated seminars and lectures. Given the scale of institutions and the growing student population, it’s unrealistic for lecturers to rely on traditional scheduling techniques, which is why Scientia has developed a convenient solution to make it easier for students to book one-on-one time.

Resource Booker is a new cloud-based application that allows lecturers to specify when they are available for contact time, for example every other Friday from 9am to 12pm. They can release this information onto the system and any student on the course can see what is available and book a slot. What’s more, lecturers and administrative staff can monitor how the time is being used.

Further enhancements will be made to the product to allow lecturers to put controls in place, regulating how many sessions a student books or how many days’ notice they need to reserve a time. This gives them full control over their schedule while students can conveniently book additional sessions for extra support.

In this video, Eugene Concannon explains how Resource Booker helps students and lecturers take an active role in improving the university experience. If you would like to find out more about the solution please contact us to speak to a representative.